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U.S. Department of Transportation Seeks Input on Testing Vehicles with Automated Driving Systems Technologies

NHTSA contact: NHTSAmedia@dot.gov | (202) 366-9550
FMCSA contact: FMCSA.PublicAffairs@dot.gov | (202) 366-9999

U.S. Department of Transportation Seeks Input on Testing Vehicles with Automated Driving Systems Technologies

English
Updated: Wednesday, May 22, 2019


POSTED MAY 21, 2019 5:49 PM
FMCSA Seeks Public Comment on Pilot Program to Allow Drivers Ages 18-20 to Operate Commercial Motor Vehicles in Interstate Commerce

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Transportation’s (USDOT) Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) today announced that it is seeking public comment on a potential pilot program that would allow drivers ages 18-20 to operate commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in interstate commerce.

“Commercial trucks and buses are essential to a thriving national economy, and the Department wants to ensure the public has an opportunity to comment on this important potential change,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine L. Chao.

English
Updated: Wednesday, May 15, 2019


POSTED MAY 14, 2019 3:25 PM
FMCSA Declares South Dakota Truck Driver to be an Imminent Hazard to Public Safety

FMCSA Declares South Dakota Truck Driver to be an Imminent Hazard to Public Safety

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) has declared South Dakota-licensed truck driver Clayton Virgil Hall to be an imminent hazard to public safety and has ordered him not to operate any commercial motor vehicle (CMV) in interstate commerce.  Hall was served the federal order on March 27, 2019.

In January 2017, during a random USDOT controlled substance test, Hall, a commercial driver’s license (CDL) holder, tested positive for amphetamines, a Schedule II controlled substance for which he did not have a valid prescription.  Federal safety regulations prohibit a CMV driver from being on-duty and possessing or being under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

English
Updated: Wednesday, April 3, 2019


POSTED APRIL 03, 2019 5:59 PM
FMCSA Offers Resources for the Upcoming Implementation of the Commercial Driver’s License Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) today released additional online resources for Commercial Driver’s License (CDL) holders, employers, state driver licensing agencies, medical review officers, and substance abuse professionals regarding the upcoming implementation of its CDL Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse in January 2020. 

English
Updated: Thursday, March 14, 2019


POSTED MARCH 07, 2019 7:29 PM
FMCSA Acts to Upgrade Entry-Level Driver Training (ELDT) Regulations and Slash Burdensome Regulatory Costs by $18 Million Annually

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) today announced a final rule streamlining the process and reducing costs to upgrade from a Class B to Class A Commercial Driver’s License (CDL).  By adopting a new Class A CDL theory instruction upgrade curriculum, the final rule will save eligible driver trainees and motor carriers $18 million annually.

English
Updated: Thursday, March 14, 2019


POSTED MARCH 05, 2019 1:52 PM
FMCSA Declares Ohio Truck Driver to be an Imminent Hazard to Public Safety

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) has declared Ohio-licensed truck driver Doug A. Jones to be an imminent hazard to public safety and has ordered him not to operate any commercial motor vehicle in interstate commerce.  Jones, a commercial driver’s license (CDL) holder, was served the federal order on December 27, 2018.

Twice in the past six months, Jones has struck an individual while operating a tractor-trailer.  In both instances, the individual was killed. 

English
Updated: Monday, February 4, 2019


POSTED JANUARY 31, 2019 3:08 PM
FMCSA Grants Petitions to Ensure Safe and Uniform Rest Rules in California for Truck Drivers

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) today announced it is granting petitions to preempt the State of California’s meal and rest break rules, which differ from current Federal hours-of-service regulations.  

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Updated: Friday, December 21, 2018


POSTED DECEMBER 21, 2018 4:21 PM
FMCSA Declares Arkansas Truck Driver to be an Imminent Hazard to Public Safety

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) has declared Arkansas-licensed truck driver Jeffery Scott Mitchell to be an imminent hazard to public safety and has ordered him not to operate any commercial motor vehicle (CMV) in interstate commerce.  Mitchell was served the federal order on December 14, 2018.

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Updated: Wednesday, December 19, 2018


POSTED DECEMBER 19, 2018 6:07 PM
ATA California Meal Rest Break Preemption Petition

See Also: American Trucking Associations (ATA) Petition Letter

SUMMARY: FMCSA requests comments on a petition submitted by the American Trucking Associations, Inc. (ATA) requesting a determination that the State of California’s meal and rest break rules are preempted by Federal law. Among other things, FMCSA requests comments on what effect, if any, California’s meal and rest break requirements may have on interstate commerce.



POSTED SEPTEMBER 28, 2018 6:12 PM
FMCSA Streamlines Process Allowing Individuals with Properly Managed Diabetes to Operate Commercial Motor Vehicles

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) today announced a final rule revising federal regulations permitting individuals with a stable insulin regimen and properly controlled insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) to be qualified to operate commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in interstate commerce.

English
Updated: Wednesday, September 19, 2018


POSTED SEPTEMBER 18, 2018 12:43 PM

Transport Topics

Walmart’s Mike White Wins Indiana, Is Hungry for More
INDIANAPOLIS — Charles “Mike” White of Walmart Transportation is not one to rest on his laurels.

POSTED JUNE 14, 2019 4:45 PM
Oberon Receives Grant to Produce Ultra-Low-Carbon Transport Fuel
Oberon Fuels announced it received a $2.9 million grant from the California Energy Commission to produce for the first time in the United States renewable dimethyl ether, a clean-burning, ultra-low-carbon transportation fuel.

POSTED JUNE 14, 2019 3:30 PM
Exxon, Saudis Bet on Plastic, Chemicals With Coastal Texas Plant
Exxon Mobil Corp. and Saudi Arabia’s state-controlled petrochemicals company formally approved construction of a chemical complex in Texas that will process production from the Permian Basin’s booming oil and natural gas wells.

POSTED JUNE 14, 2019 2:45 PM
Don Logan's Absence Leaves Kansas Field Wide Open
At first glance, the Kansas Truck Driving Championships might be more notable by who is absent than who will be the ultimate winner. FedEx Freight Ace Don Logan, last year’s Grand Champ out of the Tank Truck division, isn’t competing at Kansas Expocentre in Topeka on June 14-15.

POSTED JUNE 14, 2019 2:30 PM
Future Is Now for Hydrogen as Fuel Source, IEA Says
Hydrogen, which has been touted as the fuel of the future much of the past five decades, finally may be on the verge of converting its potential to reality.

POSTED JUNE 14, 2019 12:00 PM
DHL Supply Chain Expands Network for Distribution of Health Care Products
DHL Supply Chain will spend $150 million to expand its network for distributing pharmaceuticals and medical devices.

POSTED JUNE 14, 2019 11:30 AM
VW’s $18.6 Billion Truck IPO to Test CEO’s Overhaul Plan
Volkswagen AG valued its heavy-trucks business at as much as $18.6 billion in a planned initial public offering that will test CEO Herbert Diess’ ambition of overhauling the carmaking behemoth.

POSTED JUNE 14, 2019 11:30 AM
China Asks for US Soy Shipment Delay, Citing Lack of Storage
Chinese state soybean buyers asked U.S. exporters to delay cargoes scheduled for July loading into August, citing limited availability of storage capacity, according to people with knowledge of the situation.

POSTED JUNE 14, 2019 11:00 AM
Perspective: When a Buyer Comes Calling, Be Ready
Being prepared when a suitor comes calling can directly affect your ability to either strike a good deal now or position your company for opportunities down the road, says Spencer Tenney of Tenney Group.

POSTED JUNE 14, 2019 10:30 AM
China Sets Sights on Hydrogen Fuel Cell Market
His vision to make China an electric-vehicle powerhouse revolutionized the global auto industry, cementing a move from the combustion engine. Now, Wan Gang says get ready for the next game-changing moment.

POSTED JUNE 13, 2019 6:45 PM

Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines

Trump to Stephanopoulos: ‘I Like the Truth,’ I Didn't Sit for Mueller Interview Because He’d ‘Get Us for Lies’

Trump to Stephanopoulos: ‘I Like the Truth,’ I Didn't Sit for Mueller Interview Because He’d ‘Get Us for Lies’President Trump appeared to be obsessed with the Mueller report during his wide-ranging interview with ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos, insisting that he read the special counsel’s report while repeatedly claiming it says there was “no collusion” despite Robert Mueller stating specifically that no determination was reached on the concept of collusion.While speaking to Stephanopoulos in the back of the president’s limousine, the president was asked what his pitch to swing voters “on the fence” would be, prompting Trump to quickly pivot to the Russia investigation, which he called a “phony witch hunt.”“Mueller comes out—there’s no collusion,” the president declared. “And essentially a ruling that no obstruction. And they keep going with it. You know what? People are angry about it.”The ABC News host pushed back, stating that he didn’t think that’s what Mueller found, causing Trump to repeat his “no collusion” mantra while adding that the probe “didn't find anything having to do with obstruction because they made a ruling based on his findings and they said no obstruction.”“They didn’t examine collusion,” Stephanopoulos countered. “He laid out evidence of obstruction.”The two then went back and forth over the issue of collusion, leading to Stephanopulous bluntly asking the president if he’d actually read the report.“Uh, yes I did, and you should read it, too,” Trump huffed as Stephanopoulos revealed he read “every word” of the report. The president reacted by cutting off Stephanopoulos and swiftly leaving the limo.The This Week anchor noted that Trump kept coming back to the Mueller report unprompted, such as when he angrily lashed out at unfavorable 2020 polling. Asked by Stephanopoulos why it bothered him so much, Trump claimed it was because of his inherent honesty.“Because it’s untrue—I like the truth,” the president, who has told over 10,000 lies while in office, said. “You know, I'm actually a very honest guy. If I thought they were correct, I wouldn’t be complaining at all. I understand that. It’s like the witch hunt that goes on. No collusion with Russia, there was no collusion.”Stephanopoulos, again, attempted to point out that the report did not say there was no collusion, to no avail.Elsewhere in the interview, Stephanopoulos pressed Trump on his refusal to sit down for an interview with the special counsel under oath, asking why he only provided written answers to Mueller.“Because they were looking to get us for lies, for slight misstatements,’ Trump replied. “I looked at what happened to people, and it was very unfair. Very, very unfair. Very unfair.”Stephanopoulos, meanwhile, noted that even in his written responses, Trump didn’t answer on the subject of obstruction, wondering aloud if the president was concerned about being prosecuted once he leaves office. After claiming he “answered a lotta questions,” Trump took issue with the anchor for stating that he didn’t address obstruction.“Look, George, you're being a little wise guy, okay, which is, you know, typical for you,” Trump sneered before falling back to his familiar “no collusion” retort.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.




POSTED JUNE 16, 2019 11:15 AM

Memphis Man Killed in Police Shooting That Sparked Violent Protests Was Wanted for Assault, Robbery, Authorities Say

Memphis Man Killed in Police Shooting That Sparked Violent Protests Was Wanted for Assault, Robbery, Authorities Say"This was a violent felon who did not obviously want to go jail and they ended up, from my knowledge, doing what they had to do to not only protect themselves but to protect other people around them in the neighborhood."




POSTED JUNE 14, 2019 3:04 PM

Iran hints US could be behind 'suspicious' tanker attacks

Iran hints US could be behind 'suspicious' tanker attacksIran's parliament speaker hinted Sunday that Washington could be behind the "suspicious" tanker attacks in the Gulf of Oman to pile pressure on Tehran, official news agency IRNA reported. "The suspicious actions against the tankers... seem to complement the economic sanctions against Iran considering that (the US) has not achieved any results from them," Ali Larijani told MPs.




POSTED JUNE 16, 2019 5:52 AM

Planned Parenthood builds Ala. clinic despite abortion law

Planned Parenthood builds Ala. clinic despite abortion lawPlanned Parenthood is building the stage for another possible fight over abortion in Alabama: a large women's clinic that's under construction despite the state's passage of a near-total ban on abortions. Located beside an interstate highway in downtown Birmingham, the 10,000-square-foot structure is now nothing but a steel frame and roof. Abortion critics vow to oppose the opening, but a spokeswoman for the women's health organization said neither the new law nor opponents were a factor in the project.




POSTED JUNE 15, 2019 9:24 AM

China's FedEx probe should not be seen as retaliation - Xinhua

China's FedEx probe should not be seen as retaliation - XinhuaChina's investigation into FedEx Corp over misdirected mail should not be regarded as retaliation against the U.S. company, state news agency Xinhua said on Sunday, amid worsening relations between China and the United States. The inquiry was aimed at sending a message that any economic entity in China should abide by the country's laws and regulations, it said in a commentary. "China is willing to share the opportunities in its courier market with foreign investors.




POSTED JUNE 16, 2019 5:58 AM

How the AH-64 Apache Became the Ultimate Attack Helicopter

How the AH-64 Apache Became the Ultimate Attack HelicopterEarly in the morning of January 17, 1991, eight sleek helicopters bristling with missiles swooped low over the sands of the An Nafud desert in as they soared towards the border separating Saudi Arabia from Iraq.At 2:30 a.m., the choppers fanned out and set to work in teams of two. Rocket motors flashed as Hellfire missiles streaked towards two Iraqi radars powerful enough to potentially pick up the faint signature of a stealth plane.Minutes after the radars had been reduced to rubble, Nighthawk stealth jets soared through the twenty-mile-wide radar gap, headed for Baghdad. But the Army’s Apache attack helicopter aviators they had struck first to “kick down the door” for the Nighthawks.Nearly three decades later, the Apache’s status as the world’s premier attack helicopter remains largely unchallenged, and the type continues to see extensive action in the Middle East and in demand in countries as diverse as the UK, Egypt, India and Taiwan. Undeniably, the threats faced by the $35 million armored attack helicopter, which can pack as many as sixteen tank-busting missiles under its stub wings.




POSTED JUNE 15, 2019 6:00 AM

Father's Day 2019: Paganism, roses and how the campaign to celebrate dads was won

Father's Day 2019: Paganism, roses and how the campaign to celebrate dads was wonFather's Day, the official calendar date to honour our wonderful dads and celebrate fatherhood, is just around the corner. Recognised each June, the day sees children around the world present their dads with cards and gifts as a thank you for all they do. But when did the first observance of Father's Day take place and who helped establish the annual celebration of paternal figures? From the history behind the celebration, to the more recent commercialisation, here is everything you need to know about Father's Day. When is Father's Day 2019? Father’s Day is held every year on the third Sunday of June; this year Father’s Day falls on Sunday, June 16 in the UK. Typically, fathers are showered with cards and presents on Father’s Day, with some families celebrating together by going on days out.  Younger children also tend to make handmade gifts for their fathers at school and extracurricular clubs, including drawings, paintings or cards. As society and family structures have changed, some people now celebrate their stepfathers on Father’s Day.  In recent years there have been calls for a Stepfather's Day, however no such day has been officially discussed or introduced. Father's Day falls on June 16 this year Credit: E+ The history of Father's Day The first events in recognition of fatherhood took place in the US and followed Anna Jarvis' first celebration of Mother's Day in 1908, as well as the earlier observations of Mothering Sunday in the UK. Grace Golden Clayton, from Fairmont, West Virginia, was the woman behind the first event to celebrate fathers in 1908. Just over a year prior to this event, the Monongah Mining Disaster took place in December 1907, with the explosion killing 361 men. Of these fatalities, 250 were fathers. In honour of the one thousand children who lost their fathers, Clayton encouraged her pastor, Rev. Robert Thomas Webb, to hold a service at the Williams Memorial Methodist Episcopal Church South. Clayton missed her own father terribly, after he passed away in 1896, so she chose to honour the lives lost on July 5, 1908, the closest date to his birthday. While Clayton was responsible for the first recognition of fatherhood and the paternal bond, her work didn't directly encourage the creation of Father's Day. The memorial service was never promoted outside the town of Fairmont and the service was overshadowed by the significant Independence Day celebrations held a day beforehand. Yet the idea was also picked up on in the following year, when Sonora Smart Dodd started her quest to honour fathers in the same way as mothers. Dodd, born in Arkansas in 1882, was one of six children and at the age of seven, she moved to Washington with her family. When she was 16 years old, her mother, Ellen Victoria Cheek Smart, died after giving birth to her sixth child, leaving her father, William Jackson Smart, a farmer and Civil War veteran, as a single parent.  After listening to a Mother's Day sermon at the Central Methodist Episcopal Church in 1909, Dodd felt that fathers deserved equal recognition. With the local YMCA and the Ministerial Association of Spokane, Dodd began a campaign to have the day officially recognised. The first such 'Father’s Day' was held at the YMCA in Spokane on June 19, 1910, with a number of towns and cities across America later following suit.  Support for Father’s Day quickly increased throughout the US and in 1924 President Calvin Coolidge pressured state governments to mark the celebration. President Lyndon Johnson issued the first presidential proclamation honouring fathers in 1966, making the third Sunday in June Father’s Day. Six years later President Richard Nixon signed it into law, establishing the day as a national holiday – though in the UK it does not enjoy this status. The move came after a campaign by a number of public figures, including Senator Margaret Chase Smith, who in 1957 wrote to Congress: “Either we honour both our parents, mother and father, or let us desist from honouring either one. “But to single out just one of our two parents and omit the other is the most grievous insult imaginable.” Dodd's message later spread to other countries across the globe and it is thought that Britain began celebrating Father's Day after World War II. Today, the celebration of fathers has become an important commercial event for high street shops and online retailers, with promotions for the best gifts and cards appearing in the build up to the day each year. Father’s Day around the world While in the UK fathers can expect, at best, breakfast in bed and handmade card and, at worst, the day to be completely ignored, elsewhere the festival is done a little differently. In Germany, Father’s Day is called Vatertag with it also being referred to as Männertag, which means men’s day. The celebration falls on the Thursday 40 days after Easter. In certain regions it is traditional for groups of men to go into the woods with a wagon of beer, wines and meats. Heavy drinking is common and, according to official statistics, traffic-related accidents spike on this day. In Australia, Father’s Day falls on the first Sunday of September, which is their first Sunday of Spring, while in Croatia, they observe Roman Catholic tradition and celebrate fathers on March 19, Saint Joseph’s Day. In China, Father’s Day used to be celebrated on August 8 as the Chinese for eight is “ba”, while a colloquial word for father is “ba-ba” – so the eighth day of the eighth month sounds similar to “daddy”. The day has since been moved to the third Sunday of June, in line with the UK and US. In France, the day was introduced in 1949 for commercial reasons by lighter manufacturer Flaminaire. Inspired by the US' day of celebration, they created a new advert with the slogan 'Nos papas nous l'ont dit, pour la fête des pères, ils désirent tous un Flaminaire' ('Our fathers told us, for father's day, they all want a Flaminaire'). Three years later an official decree was made to recognise the day. Most countries celebrate Father’s Day on the third Sunday in June including the UK, USA, Mexico, Ireland, France, Greece, China and Japan.  However not all countries celebrate it then. In Brazil, Father’s Day falls on the second Sunday of August and this day was chosen in honour of Saint Joachim, the patron saint of fathers. According to Catholic, Anglican and Orthodox traditions, Joachim was the father of Mary, the mother of Jesus. The ultimate films on fatherhood Father's Day tales and traditions Some pagans suggest that Father's Day is closely linked to the Pagan Sun worship, because the sun is thought to be the father of the universe and the celebration of dads falls closely to the summer solstice. Roses are the official flower of Father's Day, with people previously wearing them to church on this date. While this tradition is rarely seen today, sons and daughters used to wear either a red rose in admiration of a living father or a white rose in memory of a deceased father. Sonora Smart Dodd, the founder of Father's Day, selected this flower and it is said that during the early celebrations, she handed out roses to home-bound fathers, while on a horse-drawn carriage ride around the city. Father's Day gifts and presents From cutesy cards, socks and ties to luxurious watches and fantastic car experiences, Britons present their paternal figures with an array of unique gifts on Father's Day.  But, demand for the perfect Father's Day present has led to the increasing commercialisation of the day, with retailers competing to offer the best gifts and consumers heading to their high street shops and online retailers.  According to MuchNeeded, Father's Day is a popular shopping day in both the UK and US, with 75 per cent of men expected to celebrate the occasion this year. While Britons and Americans spend a significant amount on Father's Day each year, on average it only accounts for half the spending around Mother's Day. Is it Father's Day, Fathers' Day or Fathers Day? Ah, the age old question. The answer? Many say Father's Day is the correct version. Mother's Day (which has the apostrophe before the 's') set the precedent while Father's Day was still gaining popularity. Anna Jarvis trademarked the term 'Mother's Day' – with the apostrophe before the 's' – in 1912, saying the word should 'be a singular possessive, for each family to honour its own mother, not a plural possessive commemorating all mothers in the world'. President Woodrow Wilson used this spelling when he formalised Mother's Day in 1914; this means the correct version of the word is spelled with the apostrophe before the 's'. Father's Day has followed suit, with cards on both sides of the pond including the apostrophe in the same place.




POSTED JUNE 16, 2019 8:56 AM

Field fires in Syria's Hasakeh kill 10: monitor

Field fires in Syria's Hasakeh kill 10: monitorFires engulfing vital wheat fields across Syria's northeast have killed at least 10 people, a war monitor said Sunday, as Kurdish authorities claim the blazes were set deliberately. Kurdish authorities and the Damascus regime are competing to buy up this year's harvest as fires -- some claimed by the Islamic State group -- continue to scorch crops in the country's breadbasket. The victims included civilians and members of the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces who died while trying to extinguish the blazes since Saturday, the Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said.




POSTED JUNE 16, 2019 7:57 AM

A nationwide Target register outage is now over and closed stores have reopened

A nationwide Target register outage is now over and closed stores have reopenedTarget registers are now working after a nationwide outage Saturday caused long checkout lines and closed some stores.




POSTED JUNE 15, 2019 6:06 PM

Biden Leads Pack of Democratic Hopefuls on Beat-Trump Factor

Biden Leads Pack of Democratic Hopefuls on Beat-Trump FactorElizabeth Warren, Kamala Harris, Bernie Sanders, and Pete Buttigieg are among the candidates that likely Democratic voters are at least considering in 18 states that will shape the initial 2020 fight, the poll shows. The CBS News/YouGov poll shows Biden had support of 31% of Democratic primary voters with three U.S. senators next: Warren of Massachusetts at 17%, Sanders of Vermont at 16%, and Harris of California at 10%.




POSTED JUNE 16, 2019 9:02 AM

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